Monthly Archives: September 2011

Morning Speaker: Rob Young

Dr. Rob Young, Director of Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines and coastal sedimentologist, received a $1.5 M grant from the National Science Foundation in 2007 to bring youth and science together in studying the effects of the dam … Continue reading

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Morning Speaker: Dick Goin

Dick Goin, a lifelong resident of the Olympic Peninsula, shared his experiences of fishing the Elwha River. With a record catch of more than 7,000 steelhead during his lifetime, he started fishing the river in 1938 when he was 6. … Continue reading

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Doing some math

Just had a chance to do some math for Day 1 of the Elwha River Science Symposium –  66 sessions presented means 66 different projects about the Elwha River happening concurrently. More than 300 scientists are here taking it all … Continue reading

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Afternoon Session: Nearshore Biology (i.e. What resides in the nearshore now before the sediment comes)

During the afternoon Nearshore Biology session, researchers discussed how the pending sediment flow could impact the nearshore areas at the mouth of the Elwha River. Highlights from the Nearshore Biology session:

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Afternoon Session: Wildlife

Michael Adams of U.S. Geological Survey presented on wildlife studies taking place in the Elwha Valley. Adams and his team had a simple but broad objective – gathering baseline data on riparian wildlife and their distribution prior to the salmon … Continue reading

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Afternoon Sessions: Honoring Adeline Smith

Since 1991, Jacilee Wray, an archaeologist with Olympic National Park, has been working with one of the tribe’s elders, Adeline Smith, to capture her history as a tribal member in the Elwha River Valley. Wray wanted to honor Smith by sharing some of … Continue reading

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Afternoon Session: Archaeology of Elwha Valley

Dave Conca, archaeologist and the acting chief of cultural resources at Olympic National Park discussed the archaeology work being done in the valley. While river restoration started as a fisheries and ecosystem restoration project, it’s allowed for extensive archaeology research as well. Pre-1995, the … Continue reading

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Morning Session: River Physical Science (i.e. How to deal with 24 million cubic yards of sediment)

Following Karr’s presentation, the rest of the day is being dedicated to researchers doing 20-minute presentations of work in the Elwha Valley prior to dam removal. In a standing-room only lecture hall here at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, the … Continue reading

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Morning Speaker: James Karr

James Karr is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Washington and a Sequim resident. His research specialties are tropical ecology, ornithology, stream ecology, watershed management, and environmental policy. He developed the Index of Bioitic Integrity (IBI) to directly evaluate the effects of human … Continue reading

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Speaking: Brian Winter

National Park Service Elwha River Restoration project manager Brian Winter spoke this morning with a quick overview of what will be taking place the next few years on the river. The deconstruction of the Glines Canyon starts today, with Elwha … Continue reading

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