Puget Sound Partnership-NWIFC

Information Related to Puget Sound Partnership and Federally Recognized Puget Sound Tribes and Tribal Consortia
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Makah Tribe

FY14 Project
Consistent and Vocal Policy Presence on Freshwater/Terrestrial Issues and Integration of Regional Research/Recovery Priorities – Year 5

Project Summary
The Makah Tribe will engage in four projects: (1) continuing to provide a consistent and vocal local and regional Makah presence on freshwater/terrestrial issues for the Western Strait of Juan de Fuca to further the Puget Sound Action Agenda; (2) creation of an air, water, and meteorological data management project to help assess, catalog, and georeference all available data within the region to ease ecosystem assessments; (3) continuing to maintain the long-term Washington Department of Ecology streamflow monitoring stations on the Clallam and Sekiu Rivers, with flow data used to: develop relationships of streamflow magnitude, duration, and frequency with other drainages; continue drainage trend analysis; and relate changes in suspended sediment concentration to fluctuations in stream discharge; and (4) continuing to maintain the real-time meteorological station in the Hoko river drainage for increased accuracy of Western Strait of Juan de Fuca climatic patterns.

Project Reports

FY13 Project
Pysht River Engineered Log Jam (ELJ) Implementation

Project Summary

The Makah Tribe will continue to take steps to improve floodplain reconnection through wood supplementation in wood deficient rivers of the WSJF.  They will advance the Pysht River restoration and implementation and continue as described in the NOPLE 3-year workplan. The engineering design goal is to create log jams to address the need for habitat complexity including flood flow attenuation and dispersal, and increase in number of depth and pool habitats and thermal refugia and holding habitat. With increased temperatures documented downstream of this proposed project area, implementation of the ELJ’s will create habitat features that will contribute to thermal refugia in the immediate area and downstream.

Project Reports

FY12 Project
Consistent and Vocal Policy Presence on Freshwater/Terrestrial Issues and Integration of Regional Research/Recovery Priorities – Year 3

Project Summary

The Makah Tribe will engage in four projects: (1) continuing to provide a consistent and vocal local and regional Makah presence on freshwater/terrestrial issues for the Western Strait of Juan de Fuca to further the Puget Sound Action Agenda; (2) removal of the Hake Plant Above-ground Storage Tank (AST) associated with the EPA Emergency Response Units identified Brownsfields site on the Makah Reservation; (3) continuing to maintain the long-term Washington Department of Ecology streamflow monitoring stations on the Clallam and Sekiu Rivers. Flow data obtained from these monitoring stations is used to develop relationships of streamflow magnitude, duration, and frequency with other drainages; continue drainage trend analysis; and relate changes in suspended sediment concentration to fluctuations in stream discharge; and (4) maintenance of the real-time meteorological station in the Hoko river drainage for increased accuracy of Western Strait of Juan de Fuca climactic patterns.

Project Reports

FY11 Project
Consistent and Vocal Policy Presence on Freshwater/Terrestrial Issues and Integration of Regional Research/Recovery Priorities – Year 2

Project Summary

The Makah Tribe will conduct four projects: (1) continuing to provide a consistent and vocal presence on freshwater/terrestrial issues for the Western Strait of Juan de Fuca to further the Puget Sound Action Agenda; (2) developing construction-ready designs and flood risk analysis and preparing permits for the construction of engineered logjams in 1.3 miles of the mainstem Pysht River, designed to improve stream habitat complexity, floodplain connectivity, and flood risk attenuation; (3) supporting the Lyre River and Nelson Creek North Olympic Land Trust acquisition and restoration project to assist in bridge reconstruction that will allow restoration of the nearshore habitat and improve habitat conditions at the road crossing and (4) maintaining the long-term Washington Department of Ecology streamflow monitoring stations on the Clallam and Sekiu Rivers. Flow data obtained from these monitoring stations is used to develop relationships of streamflow magnitude, duration, and frequency with other drainages; continue drainage trend analysis; and relate changes in suspended sediment concentration to fluctuations in stream discharge.

Project Reports

FY10 Project
Consistent and Vocal Policy Presence on Freshwater/Terrestrial Issues and Integration of Regional Research/Recovery Priorities

Project Summary
The Makah Tribe will conduct four projects: (1) providing a consistent and vocal presence on freshwater/terrestrial issues for the Western Strait of Juan de Fuca; (2) re-establishing long-term streamflow monitoring stations on the Clallam and Sekiu Rivers; (3) establishing a real-time meteorological station in the Hoko river drainage for increased accuracy of Western Strait of Juan de Fuca climatic patterns; and (4) restoring the degraded Pysht river floodplain habitat through the removal of noxious weeds, derelict structures, and partial funding for design of engineered log jams to increase create temperature refugia and holding areas for migrating adults.

Project Reports

FY08 Project
The Pollution Sources of the Puget Sound Gateway: Possible Interactions between Atmosphere, Ocean, and Local Dump

Project Summary
Makah Indian Tribe is located on the most northwestern tip of the continental United States in Washington State, making it an important gateway for Puget Sound water input and high volume shipping. The PSP’s Action Agenda lists the local Warmhouse Beach Open Dump closure as a high priority, and the Straits Action Area lists the threats of oil spills from the marine vessels through Makah’s Usual and Accustomed (U&A) fishing areas as a high priority as well. This project will make a joint effort and combine scientific research and inter-departmental actions to accomplish three tasks: (1) conduct preliminary planning stages towards conducting a stable isotope and trace elemental analyses to confirm the remediation necessary to close the Warmhouse Beach Open Dump; (2) conduct community outreach to reduce the volume of waste going to the dump site and assist in the design capacity for a new waste-transfer station; and (3) enhance oil spill response capabilities of the Makah Tribe.

Project Reports

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