Puget Sound Partnership-NWIFC

Information Related to Puget Sound Partnership and Federally Recognized Puget Sound Tribes and Tribal Consortia
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Muckleshoot Indian Tribe

FY15 Project
Soos Creek Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Monitoring- Year 2

Project Summary

The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe will continue their efforts in the installation and operation of a rotary screw trap in lower Soos Creek (also called Big Soos Creek), the largest sub-basin in the Middle Green-Duwamish River. Project objectives include: (1) estimating the juvenile abundance and productivity of out-migrant Chinook and coho salmon in the Soos Creek basin; (2) describing the timing, health, and condition of salmonids emigrating from the Soos Creek basin; (3) obtaining baseline data to help assess the cumulative effects of habitat trends and recovery actions on juvenile salmon abundance, health, and productivity over time; and (4) conducting spawning surveys to identify the number, location, and timing of Chinook redds.  Along with recording  the incidence of pre-spawning mortality based on female carcass egg retention, spawning surveys will provide data to generate egg-to-emigrant survival estimates.

Project Reports

FY14 Project
Soos Creek Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Monitoring

Project Summary
The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe will engage in the installation and operation of a rotary screw trap in lower Soos Creek (also called Big Soos Creek), the largest sub-basin in the Middle Green-Duwamish River. Project objectives include: (1) estimating the juvenile abundance and productivity of out-migrant Chinook and coho salmon in the Soos Creek basin; (2) describing the timing, health, and condition of salmonids emigrating from the Soos Creek basin; and (3) obtaining baseline data to help assess the cumulative effects of habitat trends and recovery actions on juvenile salmon abundance, health, and productivity over time.

Project Reports

FY13 Project
Monitoring Salmon Smolt Outmigration Survival in Lake Washington

Project Summary
The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe compare the survival of coho yearling smolts from three release locations in the Lake Washington basin to assess the effect of migration along the urban shorelines of Lake Washington, Lake Sammamish, and the Sammamish River on smolt outmigration timing, mortality, and subsequent adult return rate. Project tasks include: (1) raise, monitor, transport, and release coded wire tagged marked fish groups for release; (2) implant a representative number of coho from each release group with ultrasonic tags; (3) sample adult returns at the Chittenden (Ballard) Locks, on spawning grounds in Issaquah Creek and other WRIA 8 tributaries, and at two hatcheries; (4) monitor timing and survival of ultrasonically tagged yearly smolts; and (5) produce final report.

Project Reports

FY12 Project
Soos Creek Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Monitoring

Project Summary
The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe will engage in the installation and operation of a rotary screw trap in lower Soos Creek (also called Big Soos Creek), the largest sub-basin in the Middle Green-Duwamish River. Project objectives include: (1) estimating the juvenile abundance and productivity of out-migrant Chinook and coho salmon in the Soos Creek basin; (2) describing the timing, health, and condition of salmonids emigrating from the Soos Creek basin; (3) obtaining baseline data to help assess the cumulative effects of habitat trends and recovery actions on juvenile salmon abundance, health, and productivity over time; and (4) completing an inventory of the spawning habitat available for Chinook in the Soos Creek sub-basin and a Chinook spawning survey in 2014.

Project Reports

FY11 Project
Investigation of Fish Usage and Predation in Artificial and Natural Large Woody Debris Structures in the Green-Duwamish and Cedar Rivers

Project Summary
The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe will investigate the use of artificial and natural LWD and woody stem structures by juvenile Chinook, sockeye, coho, and steelhead to confirm how these structures affect predation rates in the lower Cedar and Green rivers for the purpose of improving the design of artificial wood structures in mitigation projects and to confirm the role of woody vegetation in reducing predation for the levee maintenance policy. Understanding how fish and their predators use these structures and the factors influencing fish survival in these urban, highly altered river corridors is a high priority for Muckleshoot as they will be able to provide input to local governments and permitting agencies on the design of such mitigation in the future.

Project Reports

FY10 Project
Investigation of Fine Sediment Loading and Effect on Salmon Spawning Habitat Quality in the Green River

Project Summary
The Muckleshoot Indian Tribe will examine fine sediment loading and intra-gravel quality in Middle Green River salmon spawning habitat areas to assess potential effects on salmon life stage survival and production. Project tasks include: (1) the collection and analysis of gravel samples; (2) a geology/geomorphology characterization of the landslide activity and future potential fine sediment supply to the river; (3) developing a plan to estimate fine sediment loading rates from the landslide, reservoir, and upriver sources; and (4) comparing intra-gravel quality within the sampled spawning habitat areas.

Project Reports

FY08 Project
Feasibility and Design of Improved Adult Salmon Migration Habitat in the Sammamish River

Project Summary
This Muckleshoot Tribe project will provide funding support for a study to determine the feasibility and design of increasing the availability of pool habitat, promote groundwater exchange/hyporheic flow, and expand thermal refuge area at selected tributary mouths and other locations in the Sammamish River to alleviate poor migration conditions for adult chinook and other salmon. The study will include delineation of existing thermal refuge areas and preparation of site specific habitat restoration designs at prioritized sites.

Project Reports

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