Puget Sound Partnership-NWIFC

Information Related to Puget Sound Partnership and Federally Recognized Puget Sound Tribes and Tribal Consortia
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Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe

FY15 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Restoration and Research – Year 6

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe (SSIT) will focus on continuing two projects and initiating two new projects in support of the efforts by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC) to advance the Puget Sound Action Agenda: The first project will reinforce a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries. The Tribe will focus its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids. The second project is a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to build off the previous 5-year sediment study which measured the timing and magnitude of suspended sediment in the Sauk, Suiattle and White Chuck rivers. The new study in this proposal would measure the sediment contributions from smaller sub-basins in the Suiattle watershed to examine the influence of land-use variables and natural factors that might explain sediment production. The third project will complement the downstream sediment research by using structure-from-motion photogrammetry to develop high-resolution topography and aerial imagery of glacier termini on Glacier Peak, a major source of the coarse load in the Suiattle River watershed. Estimates will be developed for coarse sediment erosion and transport in the proglacial zone, to increase understanding of the coupling between the glacier and the river. The fourth project will be a study to determine the timing of gravel movement at the depth of salmon redds in the Sauk River, to see at what flow rates scouring of those redds begins.

Project Reports

FY14 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Restoration and Research – Year 5

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe will continue to engage in three projects: (1) reinforcement of a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries, focusing its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids; (2) partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey to determine how the timing, quantity, and sources of sediment in the Sauk and Suiattle rivers are impacting sensitive fish runs; and (3) partnering with the Skagit Climate Science Consortium, the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, and the University of Washington to project future streamflows under different global warming scenarios for the Skagit watershed, with funding from this grant focusing on the Sauk River watershed, the Skagit’s main tributary.

Project Reports

FY13 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Restoration and Research – Year 4

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe will continue to engage in three projects: (1) reinforcement of a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries, focusing its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids; (2) partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey to determine how the timing, quantity, and sources of sediment in the Sauk and Suiattle rivers are impacting sensitive fish runs; and (3) conducting a multidisciplinary study, including establishing baseline salmon habitat data, to assess the potential ecological impacts of climate warming on fishery restoration and human community infrastructure in the Sauk and Suiattle watersheds.

Project Reports

FY12 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Restoration and Research – Year 3

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe will continue to engage in three projects: (1) reinforcement of a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries, focusing its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids; (2) partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey to determine how the timing, quantity, and sources of sediment in the Sauk and Suiattle rivers are impacting sensitive fish runs; and (3) conducting a multidisciplinary study to assess the potential ecological impacts of climate warming on fishery restoration and human community infrastructure in the Sauk and Suiattle watersheds.

Project Reports

FY11 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Restoration and Research

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe will engage in three projects: (1) continued reinforcement of a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries, focusing its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids; (2) continued partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine how the timing, quantity, and sources of sediment in the Sauk and Suiattle rivers are impacting sensitive fish runs; and (3) conducting a multidisciplinary study to assess the potential ecological impacts of climate warming on fishery restoration and human community infrastructure in the Sauk and Suiattle watersheds.

Project Reports

FY10 Project
Sauk-Suiattle Knotweed Eradication and Sediment Research

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe will engage in two projects: (1) reinforcement of a multiagency partnership to eradicate knotweed from the Skagit River watershed and its major tributaries, focusing its efforts on the Sauk and Suiattle rivers, both of which feature key spawning and rearing habitat for Puget Sound salmonids; and (2) engaging in a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to determine how the timing, quantity, and sources of sediment in the Sauk and Suiattle rivers are impacting sensitive fish runs.

Project Reports

FY08 Project
Upper Skagit/Sauk River Riparian and Floodplain Restoration

Project Summary
The Sauk-Suiattle Tribe project will contribute towards the restoration of 15 acres of native vegetation along the Sauk River. The project will result in the propagation locally-adapted native vegetation for two identified restoration sites. These areas include the Bryson Road and McCleod Slough located on the Sauk River. The project will also result in the complete inventory of existing riparian/floodplain conditions in Upper Skagit and Sauk Rivers resulting in the identification of future restoration projects.

Project Reports

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