Puget Sound Partnership-NWIFC

Information Related to Puget Sound Partnership and Federally Recognized Puget Sound Tribes and Tribal Consortia
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Tulalip Tribes

FY15 Project
Monitoring Ecosystem Response to Restoration and Climate Change in the Snohomish River Estuary & Evaluating the Use of Beaver Relocation as an Ecosystem Tool in Headwater Steams of the Snohomish River Basin

Project Summary

The Tulalip Tribes will engage in two projects: (1) continuing to support Snohomish River estuary-wide biological monitoring with particular emphasis on physical and water chemistry.  Scientific information that provides foundational understanding of this ecosystem and its response to management actions (e.g., restoration) and anthropogenic alteration (e.g. climate change) is critical for adaptive management; (2) monitoring hydrologic conditions and flows on the Tulalip Reservation, which is critical to help assess climate change impacts and to project water use, availability, and surface water budgeting needed to manage water resources; and (3) assess observed ecological benefits to identify the value of reintroducing beavers into unoccupied forested areas. Project goals include monitoring ecological impacts of beaver relocation, and evaluating relocation strategies.

Project Reports

FY14 Project
Monitoring Ecosystem Response to Restoration and Climate Change in the Snohomish River Estuary & Monitoring Water Resources on the Tulalip Reservation

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribes will engage in two projects: (1) continuing to support Snohomish River estuary-wide biological monitoring with particular emphasis on fish and zooplankton assemblages and genetic assessment of DNA samples to assess salmonid origin and stock contribution (Skykomish vs. Snoqualmie vs. out of basin). Scientific information that provides foundational understanding of this ecosystem and its response to management actions (e.g., restoration) and anthropogenic alteration (e.g., climate change) is critical for adaptive management; and (2) monitoring hydrologic conditions and flows on the Tulalip Reservation, which is critical to help assess climate change impacts and to project water use, availability, and surface water budgeting needed to manage water resources.

Project Reports

FY13 Project
Monitoring Ecosystem Response to Restoration and Climate Change in the Snohomish River Estuary; Evaluating the Use of Beaver Relocation as an Ecosystem Tool in Headwater Steams of the Snohomish River Basin; Support and Analysis of Pilot Study for EPA Triple Value Simulation Project for the Snohomish and Stillaguamish Basins.

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribes will continue to engage in three projects: (1) engaging in Snohomish River estuary-wide biological monitoring with particular emphasis on juvenile Chinook salmon and avian use; and initiate long-term monitoring of hydrology (temperature, salinity, and water levels), elevation, and sediment dynamics at selected sites across the estuary; (2) identifying optimal sites for the relocation of nuisance beavers in the Snohomish River Watershed and monitoring the effects of these relocated beavers to assess observed ecological benefits and identify the value of reintroducing beavers into unoccupied forested areas; and (3) providing staff support, research, and analysis for a partnership with EPA to conduct a pilot study on the application of EPA’s Triple Value (3V) simulation model as a tool to inform management and policy initiatives to improve sustainability and resilience in the Snohomish and Stillaguamish basins.

Project Reports

FY12 Project
Monitoring Ecosystem Response to Restoration and Climate Change in the Snohomish River Estuary

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribes will utilize this funding to continue and extend Snohomish River estuary-wide biological monitoring with particular emphasis on juvenile Chinook salmon and avian use; and initiate long-term monitoring of hydrology (temperature, salinity, and water levels), elevation, and sediment dynamics at selected sites across the estuary. The Snohomish River estuary is an important part of the Tulalip Tribes’ natural heritage, and improvement in the condition of this and other estuaries is a major component of Puget Sound ecosystem management, including the Puget Sound Partnership Action Agenda and the Snohomish River Basin Salmon Recovery Plan. Scientific information that provides foundational understanding of this ecosystem and its response to management actions (e.g., restoration) and anthropogenic alteration (e.g., climate change) is critical for adaptive management.

Project Reports

FY11 Project
A Comparative Analysis of Resource Management and Restoration Policies and Authorities of the Tulalip Tribes and Adjacent or Overlapping Jurisdictions; Baseline Budgets and Goals to Increase Carbon, Nitrogen and Water Storage in the Snohomish River Basin; Using Beaver as an Ecosystem Service Provider on Forestlands in the Snohomish River Basin; & The Snohomish Senior Leadership Conference

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribes will engage in four projects: (1) conducting a comparative analysis of resource management and restoration policies and authorities of the Tulalip Tribes and adjacent or overlapping jurisdictions, resulting in a report that will identify potential areas of conflict and make recommendations for potential resolution, where appropriate; (2) determining carbon and nitrogen budgets in the Snohomish Basin and identifying a carbon augmentation goal for the Basin, utilizing an integrated model of the Snohomish Basin that will have the ability to inform the development of funding mechanisms for investment in natural infrastructure restoration and conservation; (3) investigating the ecological benefits of beaver in the Snohomish River Basin through identification of the current beaver population, monitoring ecological benefits, and evaluating the feasibility of relocation strategies; and (4) holding a two-day Snohomish Senior Leadership Conference to identify and move projects forward that benefit all sectors across the Snohomish basin: farms, the environment, forestry and business.

Project Reports

FY10 Project
Pilchuck Watershed Protection Strategy; Baseline Budgets and Goals to Increase Carbon, Nitrogen and Water Storage in the Snohomish River Basin; A Comparative Analysis of Resource Management and Restoration Policies and Authorities of the Tulalip Tribes and Adjacent or Overlapping Jurisdictions; and Building Healthy Soils in the French Creek Watershed through Community Engagement and Stewardship

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribes will engage in four projects: (1) identifying protection priorities based on benefits to Chinook salmon recovery by utilizing Watershed Characterization results and current subbasin data, including known impairments, zoning information, and resource management plans and ecosystem service information; (2) providing additional support for an FY11-supported project conducting comparative analysis of resource management and restoration policies and authorities of the Tulalip Tribes and adjacent or overlapping jurisdictions; (3) providing additional support for an FY11-supported project creating an integrated model of the Snohomish Basin that provides carbon and nitrogen budgets and identifies a carbon augmentation goal for the Basin; and (4) providing a targeted outreach campaign in the French Creek Watershed to build a sense of communal and comprehensive environmental stewardship.

Project Reports

FY09 Project
Innovative Planning, Design and Regulatory Approaches to Protect Water Resources in Quilceda Creek

Project Information
This project was directly administered by the EPA; the project description, funding amount, and information for all FY09 Tribal Implementation Assistance Grants can be found on the EPA website.

FY08 Project
An Investigation of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Use of Small Non-natal Coastal Streams in the Whidbey Basin

Project Summary
The Tulalip Tribe proposal includes three distinct elements. The first is an assessment of the role of non-natal streams as rearing and refuge habitat for juvenile Chinook and other salmon in the Whidbey Basin. This will involve small stream sampling study to better understand how, when, and where juvenile Chinook utilize small non-natal coastal streams. The results can be applied for assessing protection and restoration priorities within the basin. The second element will focus on the coordination of harvest and hatchery management with the habitat projects in the basin resulting a single prioritized list of projects for salmon recovery in the basin. The third element includes actions that are part of a larger 10 step process to establish an ecosystem based management plan in Port Susan. The actions are to identify up to 8 focal conservation targets and assesses the viability of focal conservation targets.

Project Reports

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